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WWII UNITED STATES MILITARY WORKING DOGS




REMEMBERING OUR WWII WAR DOGS


"The K-9 Corps"


From the kennels of the country,
From the homes and firesides, too;
We have joined the canine army,
Our nation's work to do;

We serve with men in battle,
And scout through jungles dense;
We are proud to be enlisted
In the cause for the Dogs for Defense;

Through the watches of the darkest night
We are ever standing alert;
And if danger comes we stick by our men,
All the rights of the flag we assert;

So bare our fangs in man's behalf
And the cause he is fighting for;
We are glad to serve as members
Of Uncle Sam's trappy, scrappy K-9 Corps.

~ Arthur Roland ~




LeJuene Globe Newspaper account of the first official photo's from Iwo Jima March 7, 1945; "Members of a Marine War Dogs Platoon move up to the front lines on Iwo Jima. The dogs are a great asset in this type of operation due to their ability to ferret out enemy snipers and to act as speedy messengers."




Cry havoc and let slip the dogs of War!

~ Shakespeare ~


Remember Our WWII Military Working Dogs









*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*="War Dog Tribute"=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*

Dogs have been used to assist with military operations for centuries
and were not uncommon companions during earlier wars mainly
serving in the capacity of sentries.

1942 saw the United States Military launch an intense campaign to
recruit and train dogs for a variety of military duties. The Dogs
For Defense program was initiated in January of 1942 and an
enormous nationwide patriotic effort began to procure from
American families dogs between the ages of 1 and 5 years of age,
either sex, and of any breed for active duty training and placement
with American Troops. American families from all walks of life,
and from all 48 states enlisted their pets for the war effort.

A criteria regarding the most suitable dogs for military duty was
established. The most desirable candidate being neutral to dark
in coloring, 20-26 inches in height to the shoulder, generally
40 to 80 lbs, and ideally the recruit would be between one and
two years of age.

During WWII approximately 20,000 American Dogs were enlisted for
military service and of those recruited dogs about half actually
completed their training and began service. The other half in some
cases dying before reaching their training posts, or before
having completed their schooling. Many of the remaining dogs
were disqualified from the program for a variety of reasons during
the training process.

The most desirable breed of dog for military service generally
being the Doberman Pinscher, Collie, German Shepard, Siberian
Husky, Belgian Sheep Dog, Alaskan Malamute, and Siberian Husky
~ mixed breeds within these groups were also considered acceptable.
Our Military Working Dogs during WWII were trained to serve our
country through the daunting duties of Sentry, Scout, Sled and
Pack, Messenger, and Mine Detectors. Due to the intelligence,
dedication and loyalty of our United States Military Working Dogs
countless US Military human lives were saved during WWII. The
heroic service and unparallel devotion of our War Dogs should
always be remembered with national gratitude.



Great War Dog Links;
Dogs and National Defense
The United States War Dog Association
DEVIL DOGS AMERICAN UNSUNG HEROES
National Geographic
WWII US CANINES IN COMBAT
K-9 HISTORY - THE DOGS OF WAR!... Composite History Pages!

Many thanks to Doc's Patriotic Graphics



    A tale begun in other days, when summer suns were glowing ~



              Lodestone "Laddie" Laird
              1940 ~ 1942

              Civilian Owner; Girard L. Ordway ~ Spokane, WA

                   

                    A simple chime that served to time the rhythm of our rowing ~
                       






      +++++++ 2003 +++++++